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September 14, 2005

Notes from the home front

Iowa-side people who care about school board elections got little help from the media, and most of that was on the blog Davenport Daily Politics. Print, TV didn't notice the election. Somebody at DDP belatedly did.
The ensuing discussion provided basics, who's running for what, etc., and some info on some of the candidates. Better than the "real" media did.

Biggest turnout was in Davenport; 'bout 2,500 votes. Yawn, these people only spend more of our real estate taxes than anybody else.

DDP doing a good job, too, of keeping track of the 43 candidates running for Davenport city hall seats in upcoming city elections. Links to candidate websites, discussions of personalities and issues, etc.

Of interest primarily to junkies so far, the DDP elex stuff will be a great catch-up resource for people who don't wake up til the week, or day, before they have to vote.

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So the reports on the Green Day concert at The Mark in Moline are rolling in. Packed. Loud. Good time had by all.

Introducing one of its several anti-war songs, the band's front guy said the tune "was a great big f**k you to George W. Bush."

The stuffed-to-the-rafters arena in Quad-Cities USA roared its approval.

Thursday a.m. -- Here's a review.

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Posted by jcb at September 14, 2005 10:53 PM

Comments

Actually, I think they played only one song that was anti-war, but Billie Joe took another jab when he introduced the band. He said, "And my name is George W. Bush," which drew some boos and then he added, "I mean, my name is a------."
Later on he exhorted the crowd to guard its civil liberties and "speak the truth about what's important."
I haven't been to a concert like this in awhile, so I was a little taken aback at the fact that everyone was searched before going in. Silly to confiscate cameras when everybody is carrying a camera phone.
Now that cell phones are de rigueur, the arena looks very pretty when all wave their open glowing phones. Better than lighters!

Posted by: Anonymous at September 15, 2005 09:45 AM

Sean Leary's review didn't make out here to The Styx, but I have to say that it is really pathetic that today's youth have to take their cue from entertainers. Back in the day, we took our cues from SDS and other radical/demented groups.

Can you imagine our complaisant kids today taking to the streets and chanting Hey Hey LBJ, How Many Kids Did You Kill Today? Yeah, me neither. It's more a fashion statement than a strongly held belief.

Posted by: paladin at September 15, 2005 02:17 PM

I think the fashion statement thing goes both ways though. I will grant you that many of the kids Bush-hating at a Green Day concert are getting on a bandwagon and are doing so because that's the "cool" thing to do in their group. But do you think kids at a Brooks and Dunn or Toby Keith concert who hold the opposite view are any better informed? I don't think either group has strongly held beliefs and I don't have much respect for either. It all goes back to this country being divided as hell. Here in the QC it is probably fashionable to be anti-Bush and anti-Iraq war. Go to Idaho, or even western parts of Iowa and southern parts of Illinois and you'll see the opposite.

As for the anti-war camps now and during Vietnam, I think we are talking apples and oranges. In talking to folks who were around then (I wasn't) I get the impression that the anti-war movement was more sympathetic to the Vietnamese than anyone else. If I am totally off base here please correct me. I think those of us today who are against the Iraq war are more sympathetic to our troops over there. Not to say I'm unsympathetic to the Iraqi people but my biggest reasons for not wanting us to be there have very little to do with them. At the risk of sounding like a jerk, I care much more about my friends that are fighting over there and about the problems this war will cause for mine and my daughter's generations here in the US. I am sure there are radicals in this anti-war movement too, but we won't let them hijack it.

Trust me, I would want to beat the crap out of someone spitting on a soldier today as much as anyone who is for this war.

Posted by: tiz (formerly t) at September 15, 2005 10:25 PM

I was about the age of the kids at the Green Day show when Vietnam was in full swing. Too young to vote but old enough to have opinions and be aware of what was going on.

Never did I see or hear of anyone I knew blaming the soldiers. I've always felt the whole "protesters hate the our troops" thing was whipped up to make the anti-war folks look bad.

The crowd at Green Day was reacting to the excitement of the moment, true, but also on a day when the president's approval rating was at an all-time low for him. He just ain't a popular guy right now and it's not only the war. Katrina probably gave him the other black eye, fair or not.

There are plenty of parallels between Iraq and Vietnam, too obvious to reiterate. The reason young people aren't reacting the same way is the lack of a draft.

Posted by: Anonymous at September 16, 2005 09:24 AM

Really? That's strange. Usually when multi-millionaire punk rockers say negative but nonspecific things about the president, the teenagers who paid to see them boo. How unusual.

Posted by: le biel at September 16, 2005 07:05 PM

I was in college beginning in 1967, and I can tell you unequivocally that the primary event driving the anti-war feeling then was the draft. That's why you'll never see mass crowds of under-30's marching in the street protesting the Iraq war----it's a fashion statement now, not literally life or death like it was in the 60s.

Posted by: paladin at September 16, 2005 07:35 PM

It was the fact of the draft PLUS the fact that most people knew somebody who had lost somebody in Viet Nam. So it was way more personal than Iraq is.

Most people nowadays not only don't know anyone who has lost a family member, they don't even know anyone who's been in the Iraq war. So it's just not as real: yet.

Posted by: Anonymous at September 16, 2005 09:31 PM